In the Studio with Simon Wright

April 14, 2020

In the Studio with Simon Wright

A Creative Insight

As the front runner dealers for Simon Wright's blueprint, Cityscape artwork, Wyecliffe is pleased to share an insight into the artist's creative process as well as developing your own style. In an exclusive interview, the artist also provides his top tips for getting inventive in the coming weeks;

“Structurally I took inspiration from deficit interiors; broken plaster board exposing wooden beams, in keeping with the industrial aspect that influence a lot of the work. I then started to think about opposing ideas - ‘new and old’ and ‘life and death’ were the original working titles and this is where the theme developed,"
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... strewn across the plaster and firmly in the foreground is chaotic life and messy interpretations. The pop culture references are deliberately ambiguous and even random with some much darker ones too. I liked the idea of contrasting this against the palette background in something a bit more zen, clean, golden and rich”


Simon Wright's Style


"Cityscape has always been an authentic reflection of my drawings and paintings... it’s been my sole passion all my life. Even when I got a degree as an illustrator, which was always a plus, I began to realise I enjoyed more fine art painting and urban scenery as the nature of these genres gave me flexibility to carry out my eye for detail. One example is using natural light to reflect of the oil spots in my paintings which in effect, allows the structure of famous landmarks to become exposed for it's aesthetic beauty."


Simon Wright's Pattern


"When we went into lock down I felt lucky in terms of being able to carry on painting and as my studio is at home then working from home wouldn't be a problem. And compared to some poor people in other industries I felt very fortunate, so I took the decision to carry on as normal and stick to the same routine I do every day. I felt if I changed in anyway it would be counter productive. I always feel very motivated which I realised early on is the result of my work pattern, I'm up at 5.30am every day then its a big walk with my two dogs then painting all day till evening around 7 or 8pm."

As the front runner dealers for Simon Wright's blueprint, Cityscape artwork, Wyecliffe is pleased to share an insight into the artist's creative process as well as developing your own style. In an exclusive interview, the artist also provides his top tips for getting inventive in the coming weeks;


SIMON WRIGHT'S STYLE


"Cityscape has always been an authentic reflection of my drawings and paintings... it’s been my sole passion all my life. Even when I got a degree as an illustrator, which was always a plus, I began to realise I enjoyed more fine art painting and urban scenery as the nature of these genres gave me flexibility to carry out my eye for detail. One example is using natural light to reflect of the oil spots in my paintings which in effect, allows the structure of famous landmarks to become exposed for it's aesthetic beauty."


SIMON WRIGHT'S PATTERN


"When we went into lock down I felt lucky in terms of being able to carry on painting and as my studio is at home then working from home wouldn't be a problem. And compared to some poor people in other industries I felt very fortunate, so I took the decision to carry on as normal and stick to the same routine I do every day. I felt if I changed in anyway it would be counter productive. I always feel very motivated which I realised early on is the result of my work pattern, I'm up at 5.30am every day then its a big walk with my two dogs then painting all day till evening around 7 or 8pm."

How has lock down affected your routine as an artist?

"My working day is usually working on around 7 paintings at the same time but at the moment I've got around 25 or so on the go which is great for me because I rotate them so I when I work on each piece its fresh eyes and new enthusiasm. I would say try and stick to your own pattern whether it be 5 hours a day or 2 or 10, what ever works best for you. I would suggest if the creativity is not happening on that day for what ever reason, maybe try something new to fill your normal working day."

How has lock down allowed you to be more creative?

"Its certainly given me the opportunity to try different ideas, which is something I love doing however the ideas have to come naturally, trying to come up with something is generally forced and not that great. Ideas come from things I might see or an idea might just pop into my head. Also ideas come from mistakes, I've done so many paintings which I haven't been happy with and consequently binned but in the painting there's a colour or a texture or a mistake which I can develop, it might be a couple of inches in the corner of a painting but it can inspire me to take it further. That's happened to me so many times you wouldn't believe. I'm a big fan of learning from your mistakes, I really believe if you've never failed you've never taken a risk. Taking a risk is part of the thrill, who cares if it doesn't work, its all part of the process."

What are your tips for managing time during lock down?

"Do something to full-fill your working day. I never do "research" in my studio as I am in there to be practical and any research is just a waste of studio time, so I leave that to the evenings, I will put everything I need to do for the following day into a folder on my laptop then its all there ready for the next days work. One thing that does give me a break is guitar, I've got a couple around the studio, I've been playing for over 30 years so if I'm struggling to get something right ill just stop for a bit and play my guitar maybe come up with a tune etc. I find it a great distraction. I think its good to be able to do something else even if its just for 10 minutes, if its reading a magazine or a book, a distraction can be productive."

What are your suggestions to get inventive at this time?

"I must say it is understandably challenging to feel inspired during these times... But I try to have a positive attitude, it's as simple as that. One way of doing so is through music, as it is a big inspiration to me - I listen to a lot of heavy music which really inspires me but its not for everyone... Maybe look at your family and the time we are spending with each other, maybe look at the neighbours chatting over the fence/mowing the lawn, all the things we usually take for granted are very special to us all, especially under these new circumstances. Maybe paint your children playing in the garden, maybe draw your neighbour mowing the lawn, look around the place where you live and you might see things you usually just walk by, you never know there might be a great painting in it. Look at things you don't usually have the time to see and take advantage."

In what ways can people get started with Art?

"Art can take may forms not just painting or drawing, maybe in this down time we are all having, and you are (for example) clearing out the shed, there might be some old wood or nik naks in there that could inspire you to be creative and make something, or even if you always fancied drawing or painting and your not able to get art materials, even if you don't have a pencil get a ball point pen and just draw something that inspires YOU. It could be a tree whilst your sat in the garden or the birds or a buildings you see out of your window.. It might be the best thing you've drawn, it might be the worst, ultimately it doesn't matter at least you've started to be creative, And if your not happy with the result I guarantee the next will be better and the next will be even better."

What inspirations are you drawing from?

"At the moment I'm trying to get a feel of the city, in that I mean I'm trying to not concentrate on accuracy, but more the feel a cityscape gives, Im using a lot of palette knife at the moment which gives me a impressionistic feel. I love the random marks in the paintings which when you step back all makes sense, but close up is very erratic. I love all techniques and use then all, I try get the best method to portray the feel im trying to get into a painting."


A FINAL MESSAGE


Maybe look at your family and the time we are spending with each other, maybe look at the neighbours chatting over the fence/mowing the lawn, all the things we usually take for granted are very special to us all, especially under these new circumstances.

Stay Safe,

Simon Wright


How has lock down affected your routine as an artist?


"My working day is usually working on around 7 paintings at the same time but at the moment I've got around 25 or so on the go which is great for me because I rotate them so I when I work on each piece its fresh eyes and new enthusiasm. I would say try and stick to your own pattern whether it be 5 hours a day or 2 or 10, what ever works best for you. I would suggest if the creativity is not happening on that day for what ever reason, maybe try something new to fill your normal working day."


How has lock down allowed you to be more creative?


"Its certainly given me the opportunity to try different ideas, which is something I love doing however the ideas have to come naturally, trying to come up with something is generally forced and not that great. Ideas come from things I might see or an idea might just pop into my head. Also ideas come from mistakes, I've done so many paintings which I haven't been happy with and consequently binned but in the painting there's a colour or a texture or a mistake which I can develop, it might be a couple of inches in the corner of a painting but it can inspire me to take it further. That's happened to me so many times you wouldn't believe. I'm a big fan of learning from your mistakes, I really believe if you've never failed you've never taken a risk. Taking a risk is part of the thrill, who cares if it doesn't work, its all part of the process."


What are your tips for managing time during lock down?


"Do something to full-fill your working day. I never do "research" in my studio as I am in there to be practical and any research is just a waste of studio time, so I leave that to the evenings, I will put everything I need to do for the following day into a folder on my laptop then its all there ready for the next days work. One thing that does give me a break is guitar, I've got a couple around the studio, I've been playing for over 30 years so if I'm struggling to get something right ill just stop for a bit and play my guitar maybe come up with a tune etc. I find it a great distraction. I think its good to be able to do something else even if its just for 10 minutes, if its reading a magazine or a book, a distraction can be productive."


What are your suggestions to get inventive at this time?


"I must say it is understandably challenging to feel inspired during these times... But I try to have a positive attitude, it's as simple as that. One way of doing so is through music, as it is a big inspiration to me - I listen to a lot of heavy music which really inspires me but its not for everyone... Maybe look at your family and the time we are spending with each other, maybe look at the neighbours chatting over the fence/mowing the lawn, all the things we usually take for granted are very special to us all, especially under these new circumstances. Maybe paint your children playing in the garden, maybe draw your neighbour mowing the lawn, look around the place where you live and you might see things you usually just walk by, you never know there might be a great painting in it. Look at things you don't usually have the time to see and take advantage."


In what ways can people get started with Art?


"Art can take may forms not just painting or drawing, maybe in this down time we are all having, and you are (for example) clearing out the shed, there might be some old wood or nik naks in there that could inspire you to be creative and make something, or even if you always fancied drawing or painting and your not able to get art materials, even if you don't have a pencil get a ball point pen and just draw something that inspires YOU. It could be a tree whilst your sat in the garden or the birds or a buildings you see out of your window.. It might be the best thing you've drawn, it might be the worst, ultimately it doesn't matter at least you've started to be creative, And if your not happy with the result I guarantee the next will be better and the next will be even better."


What inspirations are you drawing from?


"At the moment I'm trying to get a feel of the city, in that I mean I'm trying to not concentrate on accuracy, but more the feel a cityscape gives, Im using a lot of palette knife at the moment which gives me a impressionistic feel. I love the random marks in the paintings which when you step back all makes sense, but close up is very erratic. I love all techniques and use then all, I try get the best method to portray the feel im trying to get into a painting."



A Final Message


Maybe look at your family and the time we are spending with each other, maybe look at the neighbours chatting over the fence/mowing the lawn, all the things we usually take for granted are very special to us all, especially under these new circumstances.

Stay Safe,

Simon Wright

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